ABOUT US

The history of CamelWay HEALTHY FOOD dates back to 2009, when we started our adventure with healthy food and started preparing healthy drinks, creating a unique recipe for aloe drinks. In our journey we encountered camel milk, the properties of which charmed us. We decided to start the project of creating products based on this unique raw material in terms of health.

John Payne, Chairman and CEO of Purelife Health Sciences Group, LLC, in investigating the history of camel milk, he found that camel milk has been part of the diet of people in the Middle East, northern African and some parts of Asia for centuries. In fact, the Bedouins, nomadic people in the Middle East and Asia continue to drink camel milk as a major part of their diet. He found that these people rarely suffer from some of the chronic diseases that now plague people in that region who have adopted a "western diet", including diabetes and heart disease.

TECHNOLOGICALLY
ADVANCED CAMEL FARMS

Our milk comes from the largest, most modern and technologically advanced Camel Farms in the World. It is fully complaint in all National and International quality and safety standards; such as HACCP and ISO across all its production operations.

Camel Milk
production

Camel is a multipurpose animal used for economic and social aspects. During the last five decades, by increasing about 4.43 folds, world camel milk production reached to 2.8 m tons.

In addition to be a good source of Vit-C, Ca and K, all essential nutrients found in bovine milk also exist in camel milk. Due to smaller fat globules, creaming capacity of camel milk is poorer than that of bovine milk and also camel milk fat melting point is higher than those of bovine, sheep, goat and buffalo milk fat.

Camel milk has also potential in the treatment of series of diseases.

Camel milk has a lack of β-lactoglobulin and can be used to cure food-born allergies. In conclusion, especially in the regions where other livestock are failure to be thrived, camel milk is the main source of animal origin food, but in other regions its social and therapeutic roles become prominent.